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McCombs Office Solutions and Tips

Removing AutoFormatted Lines in Microsoft Word

Screenshot of two documents in Microsoft Word

Earlier this week, a friend posted on Facebook about the ease of inserting a line in a Microsoft Word and the difficulty of removing it.  It seems to be a headache for many people, and I am unsure why Microsoft ships Word with the default autoformatting options to make that line.  However, once it is inserted, it is easy to remove with a couple of clicks.  If you never want that line to appear again, you can set Microsoft Word to not create the lines anymore.

Remove Existing Line From A Word Document

Microsoft Word creates those lines as borders.  To remove the line:

  1. Place the cursor in the line immediately above the line.
  2. On the Home tab, click on the Border formatting menu.
  3. Click on No Border.  See the screenshot below for the click path.

Screenshot showing the Formatting Borders options in Microsoft Word

 

Alternatively, if you notice the line immediately after Word inserts it, you can click on the Smart Tag to see further options.  These include undoing the border line, and stopping automatic border line creation.  See the screenshot below for the Smart Tag button and its menu options.

Screenshot showing the Smart Tag in Microsoft Word

Set Word To Never Create Those Lines Again

In Word 2010 and 2007

  1. In Word 2010, click on the File menu, and choose Options.  In Word 2007, click the Office button, and choose Word Options.
  2. In the left column, click on Proofing.  Then click the Autocorrect Options button.
  3. Click on the AutoFormat As You Type tab.
  4. In the Apply as you type section, uncheck the box next to Border lines.  See the screenshot below.
  5. Click OK, and OK again, until you return to your document.

In Word 2003

  1. Go to the Tools menu, and choose AutoCorrect Options.
  2. Click the AutoFormat As You Type tab.
  3. Uncheck the box next to Border lines.
  4. Click OK until you return to your document.

Screenshot showing the clicks in Microsoft Word's AutoFormat menu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Posts

Recover Deleted Items in Outlook

I often tell people that deleting email, especially large emails, is the best way to keep their mailbox under its size limit. But occasionally, people (myself included) delete an email or other Outlook item, then realize it was important. If you haven’t emptied your Deleted Items folder yet, then getting the item back is a breeze– just find it in the Deleted Items folder and drag it to the folder it belongs in. But if you’ve already emptied the Deleted Items folder, things get a bit trickier.

Some items can be recovered even after the Deleted Items folder has been emptied, depending on the kind of item and how long it has been since you emptied the folder. The amount of time you have to recover an item depends on your Exchange Administrator.

Recover Deleted Items in Outlook 2010

  1. Select your Deleted Items folder.
  2. Go to the File tab on the ribbon.
  3. In the Clean Up group click Recover Deleted Items.
  4. Select the item(s) you would like to recover.
  5. Click Recover Selected Items.

Recover Deleted Items in Outlook 2007 

  1. Select your Deleted Items folder.
  2. Go to Tools > Recover Deleted Items…
  3. Select the item(s) you would like to recover.
  4. Click the Recover selected items button.

Please note: These instructions only apply to items sent to the Deleted Items folder and then emptied from it. If you deleted an item using the Shift + Delete shortcut (not recommended), or if you deleted an attachment but not the email, you cannot recover them through this method.

Related Items

Outlook 2010′s Clean Up Feature

Reduce Inbox Spam in Outlook

Keep Under Your Mailbox Limit by Deleting Attachments

Keeping Track of Where You Save Outlook Attachments

Send Email Without Saving It in Outlook 2007 & 2010

 

Out of Office Message Tips

This week Ben came across a great article about best practices for using the Out of Office messages. I recommend it for any of you who use Out of Office messages or who are considering it.

8 Tips for Using Outlook’s Out of Office Assistant

When Ben sent me this article, I was shocked to realize that we didn’t have a post on the blog about how to set up the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook, so here goes:

 

Set Up Out of Office in Outlook 2010

You can choose to schedule when your message will begin and end sending, and whether you send only to people inside your organization or whether you send to people inside your org and out.

  1. Go to the File tab.
  2. Click on the Automatic Replies button.
  3. In the window that opens, select Send Automatic Replies.
  4. If you’d like to schedule your out of office message to start and stop automatically, check the Only send during this time range box. Set the start date and end date below.
  5. Select the Inside My Organization tab. In the box below, type and format the message you’d like people on the same exchange server to receive.
  6. Click the Outside my Organization tab. To send an Out of Office message to people outside your organization, check the Auto-reply to people outside my organization box. Type and format the message below. If you don’t want to send an Out of Office message to outside people, leave the box unchecked.
  7. When you’ve finished writing messages, click OK.

 

Set Up Out of Office in Outlook 2007

You can choose to schedule when your message will begin and end sending, and whether you send only to people inside your organization or whether you send to people inside your org and out.

  1. Go to the Tools menu and select Out of Office Assistant.
  2. Select Send out of office replies.
  3. If you’d like to schedule your out of office message to start and stop automatically, check the Only send during this time range box. Set the start date and end date below.
  4. Select the Inside My Organization tab. In the box below, type and format the message you’d like people on the same Exchange Server to receive.
  5. Click the Outside my Organization tab. To send an Out of Office message to people outside your organization, check the Auto-reply to people outside my organization box. Type and format the message below. If you don’t want to send an Out of Office message to outside people, leave the box unchecked.
  6. When you’ve finished writing messages, click OK.

 

Set Up Out of Office in Outlook Web Access

You can choose to schedule when your message will begin and end sending, and whether you send only to people inside your organization or whether you send to people inside your org and out.

  1. Log-in to Outlook Web Access.
  2. In the top right corner, click the Options button.
  3. In the left column, click Out of Office Assistant.
  4. Select Send out of office replies.
  5. If you’d like to schedule your out of office message to start and stop automatically, check the Only send during this time range box. Set the start date and end date below.
  6. In the box labeled Send an auto-reply once to each sender inside my organization with the following message, type and format the message you’d like people on the same Exchange Server to receive.
  7. To send an Out of Office message to people outside your organization, check the Auto-reply to people outside my organization box. Type and format the message in the box below.
  8. When you’ve finished writing messages, click OK.

 

Hanging out With Google Glasses

Google has created Google Glasses, a pair of glasses with a camera attached and the ability to connect to the internet. They’re not available yet, but you can watch a fun demo involving Google Glasses, Google Hangouts, several people jumping out of a blimp, bikes, and rappelling. Take a look and happy Friday!

Related Post:

Google+

 

Find Circular References in Excel

No circular references (when a formula or function references itsself) was one of the essentials in my Five Formulas and Functions Essentials post. Generally, if you have a circular reference, you’ll get an error message warning you about it. But the message doesn’t tell you where your circular reference is. And if you click Cancel on the message, it leaves the circular reference in the spreadsheet. So the question becomes, how do you find a circular reference in Excel?

 

Find a Circular Reference in Excel

Excel has built in error checking tools that will help you locate circular references.

  1. Go to the Formulas tab.
  2. In the Formula Auditing section, click the drop down arrow to the right of the Error Checking button.
  3. In the menu that drops down, hover over Circular References. A window will pop out to the side telling you which cells contain circular references.

 

Need to Use a Circular Reference?

In some cases, you may need to use a circular reference. If you do, Chandoo.org (a great Excel resource) has a really useful post all about how to use circular references. Read Chandoo’s post on circular references.