Tag: MBA admissions (page 1 of 2)

Beyond the Numbers: A Holistic MBA Application Evaluation

In the world of MBA Admissions, your numbers are not everything. By “numbers,” we’re referring to the stats and scores that applicants tend to focus on when they submit an MBA application– undergraduate GPA, total GMAT/GRE score, percentiles, etc. With limited seats in MBA classes, organizing applications by measurable figures is logical and helpful. That’s why preparing and doing your best on the GMAT/GRE and putting your best numbers forward in your application is important.

But, you are not just a simple sum of your numeric parts– You’re an individual. And your scores are just part of your story. Answering, “who are you?” is a much bigger question.

In our review of a typical MBA candidate, GMAT/GRE and GPA alone do not offer any consistent indication of success in the program. Even if you have a 780 GMAT score, this does not automatically indicate to us that you will make high grades, find an internship, thrive in your study groups, stay positively active and engaged, or find a good job after graduation. It is the combination of strong numbers, your unique story, a commitment to Texas McCombs, and many other factors that indicate how well you’ll do in our MBA program.

Because MBA programs are limited & competitive— many candidates are enthusiastic and have strong professional backgrounds and scores— we have adopted a holistic approach to evaluating your application. So what are the intangible qualities we look for? And what will make you stand out so that you secure a spot in the class over another applicant with similar scores and background?

 There is no single answer to these questions, but here are some good tips to offer some insight on the Admissions Committee’s process:
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Choosing the Right Test for Your MBA Application

This MBA Insider content comes from the Texas McCombs MBA Admissions team and was originally posted in July 2017. 

If you’ve decided you want to apply to the MBA program at Texas McCombs– congratulations on making a fantastic decision! But, now what? One of the first application components that future students typically focus on is the required standardized test. It can be an intimidating first step. Our MBA program accepts both GRE and GMAT.  How can you know which test is best for you?

First, the Admissions Committee doesn’t have a preference on which test you take. Our article on examining your graduate test options can give you a good overview of the basic differences between the tests.

We do not believe that one test is better at demonstrating your preparedness for business school than the other. But it is important to think about what exam is best for you as an individualIn some cases, there may be a good reason to consider taking the GMAT over the GRE, or vice versa.

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Crossing all the T’s in your MBA Application

This MBA Insider info comes from the Texas McCombs MBA Admissions Team.

We know you want to put forth the best application you can when you apply to any Texas McCombs MBA program. And we’ve covered many components of the application in the past, including the resume, letter of recommendation, essays, and test scores (as well as some tips for interviewing if you are selected). But some components of the application that might be viewed as procedural are just as important, and if not addressed properly, they can delay processing, which can in turn delay your decision.

When you apply to a Texas McCombs MBA program, you’re actually applying to two separate entities at the same time. One is the McCombs School of Business; the other is the Graduate School of the University of Texas at Austin (which we’ll call GIAC, for the Graduate and International Admissions Center).

Three key components of the application are required by GIAC before it will be considered complete, and GIAC does not allow McCombs to issue a decision until these three elements are completed.

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The Ins & Outs of the Executive MBA Test Waiver

From Director of Texas Executive MBA Admissions, Sharon Barrett:

Hands down, this is the most common question I get from Executive MBA candidates:

“How does the test waiver work and do I qualify?”

So here’s the lowdown– First and foremost, the Executive MBA is the only Texas MBA program that accepts applicants’ petitions to waive the GMAT or GRE exam requirement. (Key words being “applicant” and “petition.”)  And everyone’s case is different, so there’s no recipe to follow, no checklist, and no guarantee that if you do certain things, you’ll get a waiver.

The MBA Admissions committee views each applicants’ petition in the context of their entire application, and renders a decision on the application versus a separate decision on just the waiver.

Here are the areas of consideration when reviewing an application with a petition for a test waiver:

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Before You Apply: Get a Great Recommendation Letter

Let’s start at the beginning. The instructions given on the Texas MBA application are as follows:

We require one professional letter of recommendation from a person who has supervised your work and/or has assessed your performance during your career. Professional recommendations are strongly recommended (i.e. direct supervisor, indirect supervisor, or a client). If you are unable to request a letter of recommendation from your direct supervisor or feel that another recommender would be more appropriate, please explain why in your optional statement. 

When you think about it, you (the applicant) have direct control over most components of your application – you write your essays, you take your exam, you earn your GPA, you draft your resume. The recommendation letter is one of the only things you rely on someone else to provide, which is why it can seem daunting. Circumstances differ for every applicant, so deciding who you should ask will vary depending upon your personal professional situation.  Below are some scenarios to help guide you in choosing your recommenders.

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