Category: MBA at Dallas/Fort Worth (page 1 of 5)

Insider Tips for Highlighting Your Pre-MBA Work Experience

When evaluating your application, our MBA Admissions Committee aims for a complete picture of your qualifications and fit with the program. It’s all about perspective. We look  at your application as if we are holding a scale, balancing all the parts.

When considering the specific experience on your resume, on one side there’s a raw number of years (Quantity), and on the other is your job experience (Quality).

Quantity

Say that you are the CEO of a mid-size corporation. Wonderful!  Oh, you just started in this position? That’s an amazing accomplishment, but perhaps you’d still admit that your knowledge and expertise in such a new position wouldn’t be as developed as someone who’s been doing it for a few years.

Or maybe you have been in the same job for 10 years.  Wow!  No doubt you are a go-to person when it comes to that role, but could it mean that perhaps you didn’t take as much initiative or demonstrate leadership qualities required to launch you to the next level? Or perhaps you have only had a project manager role for a year, but in that time you’ve produced measurable results and demonstrated leadership.  In these cases, the quality of your work experience matters more.

Quality

A general job title like “Project Manager” may seem lackluster, but could actually be pretty exciting.  Don’t let us make assumptions. Take every opportunity on your application to illustrate just WHAT about your job made your experience rich and rewarding.

On the flip side, a Chief Operating Office title sounds impressive, but what kind of company did you work for and how extensive were your duties?  An impressive title with naught to back it up won’t move the needle in your favor when it comes to work experience.

The take-away on work experience:  Years, titles, and accomplishments are not, by themselves deciding factors. To help you provide us with a clear picture, here are our top tips for highlighting the quality and quantity of your work experience on your resume:

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Crossing all the T’s in your MBA Application

This Insider Insight comes from the Texas MBA Admissions Team:

We know you want to put forth the best application you can when you apply to any Texas McCombs MBA program. And we’ve covered many components of the application in the past, including the resume, letter of recommendation, essays, and test scores (as well as some tips for interviewing if you are selected). But some components of the application that might be viewed as procedural are just as important, and if not addressed properly, they can delay processing, which can in turn delay your decision.

When you apply to a Texas McCombs MBA program, you’re actually applying to two separate entities at the same time. One is the McCombs School of Business; the other is the Graduate School of the University of Texas at Austin (which we’ll call GIAC, for the Graduate and International Admissions Center).

Three key components of the application are required by GIAC before it will be considered complete, and GIAC does not allow McCombs to issue a decision until these three elements are completed.

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Balancing Act: Family, Work, and Your MBA

This post was written by our Working Professional MBA staff & students:

Working professional MBA programs provide an inherent challenge– How do you manage the competing priorities of work, school, and a personal life? Many wouldn’t think of adding to that mix ,perhaps the ultimate challenge: caring for a new baby. Nevertheless, McCombs Working Professional MBA students have shown it can be done with the right planning, prioritizing, and support network.

“There’s never a ‘right’ time to have a baby,” says Denise Xue, Texas Evening MBA Class of 2017, a financial analyst at Intel who gave birth to her son Daniel in April of 2016, during her fourth semester in the program.

“Having a baby while getting an MBA is certainly not easy, but I never regret one bit. You will be extremely busy, and feel challenged both physically and emotionally, but at the same time you will also feel proud of yourself for the things that you accomplished.”

Here is some advice from Denise and other recent parents for those contemplating parenthood in combination with their Texas MBA:

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Choosing a Test for Your MBA Career Search

This is the third in a series of posts on GMAT/GRE testing. We encourage you to review previous posts, if you have not already.

Before you make a final decision on which test to take, it’s best to research some of your target companies or industries and determine two things:

  1. The extent to which they evaluate a test score in reviewing job candidates.
  2. Whether they have a preference for one of the tests. At McCombs, we have found that most consulting and investment banking firms do look at the candidate’s score, and both industries historically have favored the GMAT.

Regardless of which test you take, you should consider it as another opportunity to not only impress the Admissions Committee, but also potential employers.

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Your MBA Application: The Non-Numeric You

In the world of MBA Admissions, your numbers are not everything. Applicants do tend to focus on numbers when they submit an MBA application:  Their undergraduate GPA, total GMAT/GRE score, quant and verbal scores, percentiles, etc. With limited seats in Texas MBA classes, measurable figures can be a very helpful tool when determining who best fits into our programs. But…

You are not just a simple sum of your numeric parts. The same way that you are not just left-handed or right-handed — your scores are part of you, but certainly do not define who you are.

We should say up front that putting your best numbers forward is important. That’s why getting your best test score and putting your best GPA into your application is a must. However, in our review of a typical MBA candidate, GMAT and GPA alone do not offer any consistent indication of success in the program. Even if you do have a 780 GMAT, this does not automatically indicate to us that you will make good grades, find an internship, thrive in your study groups, or find a good job after graduation. It is the combination of strong numbers, your unique story, a commitment to McCombs, and many other things that indicate how well you’ll do in the Texas MBA Program.

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