Category: Executive MBA (page 1 of 6)

How Test Scores Factor into Your MBA Application

This is the final installment in a series of posts on GMAT/GRE testing. We encourage you to review previous posts, if you have not already.

The Texas MBA Admissions Committee recognizes that you might be putting a lot of pressure on yourself to achieve a high test score.  After all, you’re competitive and driven enough to want to pursue an MBA! It’s important to remember that your test score is only one piece of your story, and it’s considered in the context of your overall application. We review your scores with the knowledge that a test is only one day in your life, and your academic and work history span many years.

Nevertheless, the test is an important component in evaluating your application.

“Quantitative test scores, in particular, have proven to be predictive of success in an MBA program, and taking the GMAT or GRE gets you back into the practice of preparing for exams. The preparation you put into the test sets you up for the mindset you’ll have to bring to your MBA– setting aside time to study on a nightly basis and working your way through problems analytically.”

– Sharon Barrett, Director of Working Professional MBA Admissions at Texas McCombs

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Professional or Executive: Which MBA Program is Right for You?

This insider info comes from Sharon Barrett, Director of Working Professional MBA Programs.

If you compare the class profiles of our Texas Executive MBA with our Professional MBAs (Texas Evening MBA, Texas MBA at Dallas/Fort Worth, and Texas MBA at Houston programs), the differences can seem obvious. But there’s actually a broad grey area, where many professionals could fit very well in either type of program.

In the end, it’s a very personal decision about where to submit your application. But remember it’s a two-way street. You decide where you belong, and the admissions committee agrees on the fit. Here is some advice on how to make an informed choice about which MBA program to choose.

Consider Your Level & Years of Work Experience Carefully

Average work experience for the Texas MBA Program:

Program 80% Range Minimum
Professional MBA 3.25-11 years 2 years
Executive MBA 8-22 years 8 years

While people with the minimum eight years of experience do join the Executive MBA program, there are relatively few. Executive MBA candidates become more competitive within the 9-10 year range of work experience. On the other hand, Professional MBA candidates must have a minimum of two years of full-time work experience, and candidates get competitive with closer to four years. The admissions committee doesn’t simply count the years, but evaluates the quality of your work experience (the impact you’ve made to your organization, advancement in your role or responsibilities, and other factors), and also your level within the organization.

Generally, students in the Executive MBA have managed people, either directly or dotted-line, as well as budgets. Some rose to this level sooner in their careers than others. If you work in a small organization, your responsibilities can elevate very quickly. There are many manager level employees in the Professional MBA programs as well, but also quite a few individual contributors.

Executive MBA candidates on the low end of work experience and unsure of whether or not they would be a fit, should request a resume review. A short chat with a member of the admissions committee can allay any doubts about whether or not your work experience is appropriate and/or competitive.

Visit a Class to Gauge Your Fit

There’s no better way to self-assess than to sit in on an actual MBA class, especially one of the discussion-based ones. You can sign up now for an Executive MBA, Evening MBA, MBA at Houston, or MBA at Dallas/Fort Worth class visit now.

During the class, you’ll witness the collaborative and team-based environment that’s a big part of the fabric here at McCombs. The questions you should be asking yourself during your visit are: What can I contribute to this conversation? What assets would I bring to my study team?

Start Your App by Our Next Deadline: March 27, 2018

Texas MBAs are collegial, yet competitive. And the program you join will define your close-knit, professional network while in the program and beyond. Attend an event soon, or reach out to us with questions. Strategic thought about where you begin your relationship with the Texas MBA network sets you off on the right foot for your MBA journey and your career goals beyond the program. Ready to apply?

Hook ‘Em! \m/

Choosing a Test for Your MBA Career Search

This is the third in a series of posts on GMAT/GRE testing. We encourage you to review previous posts, if you have not already.

Before you make a final decision on which test to take, it’s best to research some of your target companies or industries and determine two things:

  1. The extent to which they evaluate a test score in reviewing job candidates.
  2. Whether they have a preference for one of the tests. At McCombs, we have found that most consulting and investment banking firms do look at the candidate’s score, and both industries historically have favored the GMAT.

Regardless of which test you take, you should consider it as another opportunity to not only impress the Admissions Committee, but also potential employers.

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Your MBA Application: The Non-Numeric You

In the world of MBA Admissions, your numbers are not everything. Applicants do tend to focus on numbers when they submit an MBA application:  Their undergraduate GPA, total GMAT/GRE score, quant and verbal scores, percentiles, etc. With limited seats in Texas MBA classes, measurable figures can be a very helpful tool when determining who best fits into our programs. But…

You are not just a simple sum of your numeric parts. The same way that you are not just left-handed or right-handed — your scores are part of you, but certainly do not define who you are.

We should say up front that putting your best numbers forward is important. That’s why getting your best test score and putting your best GPA into your application is a must. However, in our review of a typical MBA candidate, GMAT and GPA alone do not offer any consistent indication of success in the program. Even if you do have a 780 GMAT, this does not automatically indicate to us that you will make good grades, find an internship, thrive in your study groups, or find a good job after graduation. It is the combination of strong numbers, your unique story, a commitment to McCombs, and many other things that indicate how well you’ll do in the Texas MBA Program.

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The Benefits of MBA Test Prep

Once you’ve done your research on the format and content of the GMAT and GRE tests, you’re ready to settle on which one you want to take and start your preparation.

If you still need a review of each test to help you navigate the details, see our previous post examining both test options.

Test preparation is critical. The tests are rigorous, but your prep has the advantage of getting you in the right mindset for entering a top MBA program– where the exams and workload will be just as challenging, if not more so.

Prep tools include books that take you through the format of the test and offer practice exams, as well as formal prep classes (in person or online) and tutoring that can cost hundreds of dollars. Going with a more affordable option can work for some candidates.

“If you did well on the SAT or if you have a rigorous math background, you might be able to prepare on your own.”

– Jamie Nelson, an instructor with Manhattan Prep, which offers test prep classes in Dallas, Houston and Austin.

Here are some top prep tips from students and test prep instructors:

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