Category: Career (page 1 of 7)

Pre-MBA Work Experience: Quantity vs. Quality

When evaluating your application, our MBA Admissions Committee aims for a complete picture of your qualifications and fit with the program. It’s all about perspective. We look  at your application as if we are holding a scale, balancing all the parts.

When considering the experience on your resume, on one side there’s a raw number of years (Quantity), and on the other is your job experience (Quality).

Quantity

Say that you are the CEO of a mid-size corporation. Wonderful!  Oh, it’s your first week on the job? That’s an amazing accomplishment, but perhaps you’d still admit that your knowledge and expertise in such a new position wouldn’t be as developed as someone who’s been doing it for a few years.

Or maybe you have been in the same job for 10 years.  Wow!  No doubt you are a go-to person when it comes to that role, but could it mean that perhaps you didn’t take as much initiative or demonstrate leadership qualities required to launch you to the next level? Or perhaps you have only had a project manager role for a year, but in that time you’ve produced measurable results, saved clients money, improved processes and efficiency, and demonstrated leadership.  In these cases, the quality of your work experience matters more.

Quality

A general job title like “Project Manager” may seem lackluster, but could actually be pretty exciting.  Don’t let us make assumptions. Take every opportunity on your application to illustrate just WHAT about your job made your experience rich and rewarding.

On the flip side, a Chief Operating Office title sounds impressive, but what kind of company did you work for and how extensive were your duties?  An impressive title with naught to back it up won’t move the needle in your favor when it comes to work experience.

The take-away on work experience:  Years, titles, and accomplishments are not, by themselves deciding factors – it’s a balancing act! To help you provide us with a clear picture, here are our top tips for highlighting the quality and quantity of your work experience on your resume:

Continue reading

Landing Your Dream Job with Texas MBA Career Management

A big part of your MBA journey begins after you graduate– You’ll move up in your industry, transition into a different industry, or leverage your strong McCombs network to establish your own business ventures.

At the Texas MBA Program, our Career Management & Employment Services teams are devoted to making sure that no matter where your career takes you next, you”ll be successful.

salary stats Texas MBA. 93% accepted jobs for 2016. average salary $113.481.

Your Texas MBA degree starts paying dividends immediately. In 2015, Forbes named us the 3rd-highest return on investment (ROI) among all public MBA programs in the U.S.

Continue reading

Texas MBA Career Treks

Each year, the Texas MBA Career Management team leads Treks to various cities to visit the main offices of different companies, giving Texas Full-Time MBA students a great opportunity to learn more about their industry of interest and allowing them to become more familiar with the culture at these companies. Visits typically consist of presentations, Q&A sessions, and numerous opportunities for networking with alumni and executive management.

One of the biggest trends our Employer Relations and Career Management teams have seen has been an enormous increase in student career interest in the West Coast.

In 2010, 9% of Texas MBA graduates landed jobs on the West Coast — that percentage has nearly doubled with the class of 2016! Interest in technology companies has exploded, making it a large area of focus for our annual Treks.

Complementing those two trends, West Coast tech companies have been opening offices and/or growing their corporate presence in Austin i.e., Facebook, Google, Apple, Cisco Systems, eBay, PayPal, VMware and Electronic Arts just to name a few. We continue to build our relationships with these firms, as well as seeking new opportunities.

We have also seen every facet of student interest in entrepreneurship increase, from coming into the program already running a firm, or founding a company in business school, to working at a startup or fast growing company post-graduation.

In response, the Texas MBA Program has created many unique opportunities for MBA students to network with and connect to the startup community. We now host a biannual McCombs Entrepreneurship Night, which showcases startups founded by McCombs MBA students and/or alumni.

That event is held in conjunction with Austin Startup Week in the fall and during SXSW Interactive in the spring. The contacts made during these events are invited to our Entrepreneur Society (ES) events during the school year, such as the Pitch Party in the Fall and ES Connex in the spring, a networking night for local startups looking to hire interns or full-time candidates.

2016-2017 Career Treks 

bcg

Texas MBA students at the Boston Consulting Group offices in Dallas, TX

chevron

Texas MBA students at the Chevron offices in Houston, TX

atkearney

Texas MBA students at the A.T. Kearney office in Dallas, TX

bain-co

Texas MBA students at the Bain & Company office in Dallas, TX

baml

Texas MBA students at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch office in New York City

att

Texas MBA students at AT&T headquarters in Dallas, TX

 

Navigating Change – A Timely Topic for the Society of Women Engineers

From Sharon Barrett, Director of Working Professional & Executive MBA Admissions

I’m so grateful for this aspect of my job. This week, I had the distinct pleasure of presenting to the Austin Chapter of the Society of Women Engineers on the topic of Navigating Change, one day after this country’s historic election results. Karen Landolt, one of our MBA+ Leadership Program Coaches, engaged this group of 40 smart, professional women in exercises and discussion on this timely topic at Dell’s Parmer Lane campus. Dell and EMC are in the process merging companies, philosophies and cultures, and being aware of something as simple as the difference between Boston, where EMC is based, and Austin’s Dell is so important in forming a more perfect union.

dell-info-session

Women in attendance represented a variety of engineering disciplines from a number of well-known companies in the Austin area, and they left with some practical tools to help navigate change in their organizations, their careers and in life. They also had a chance to network with each other and talk to Dell’s career team, as well as learn more about how an MBA can help advance careers not only through academics, but also through co-curricular resources such as the opportunity to receive 16 hours of one-on-one professional coaching from a prudently procured and prolific list of professionals. MBA+ coaches come with expertise in areas such as communication, executive career paths, leadership presence, professional image, improvisation (thinking on your feet), project management, media presence, creativity and innovation, emotional intelligence, and even accent modification among other skills.

If you’d like for someone from the Texas MBA to speak at your organization whether it’s a public or private company, or a professional or special interest group located in Houston, Dallas or Austin, please contact me at Sharon.Barrett@mccombs.utexas.edu.

How an MBA Can Help Your Startup Succeed

From Harlan T. Beverly, PhD, Texas Evening MBA ’04

Every year, thousands of students flock to MBA programs nationwide to learn the craft of business. In recent years, many of those students  have come with a gleam in their eye, that of launching and succeeding with their own startup.  At The University of Texas at Austin, MBA applicants can earn a scholarship for their idea, assuming their idea is strong enough. One of the key questions about entrepreneurial education, though, is this: what does it take to succeed at a startup? And more to the point, is that something you can learn in an MBA program?

CbnPEaZUkAAZoOk

2016 TVL Scholarship winners Josh Berrington (left) and William Wilder (right)

Researchers in entrepreneurship have typically focused on the attributes of the founding team as key predictors of success.  While it is obvious that certain characteristics like risk tolerance, persistence, and charisma could be helpful in getting an entrepreneur started, there is still much debate about what it really takes to have a successful startup.

In 2004, I was one of those MBA students with that startup fire in my eye.  Now, a dozen years later and with three successful startups under my belt, I believe that there are many critical things that a student can learn in an MBA program to help better their odds of success.  Here are three things I learned as part of my MBA that I have leaned on to beat the steep odds of startup success (less than 1 in 10).

First and foremost: Define success before you begin. 

Not every startup idea is destined for an IPO or billion-dollar exit.  An MBA helped me to learn how to assess the business potential of a startup idea and set realistic goals for what success looks like.  All too often, startups fizzle out because they reach too high or even achieve limited success…but fail to exit at the right time.

Second: Learn, learn, learn. 

No matter what it’s called – “market validation” or “lean startup” or listening to customers – learning, and adapting is essential to success.  My MBA helped me understand both what I needed to learn (pricing for example), and how I could learn what I needed from real customers quickly.

Finally: Success is never achieved in a vacuum.

My MBA helped me to understand the importance of networking. Hiring and firing are essential leadership skills as a company grows, and an MBA not only helps you understand the leadership principles, but also helps you develop team-based skills to work well with others. For me, it was at UT Austin that I met the co-founders of my first company, as well as many future business partners.

Clearly there are many things to learn and skills to develop as part of an MBA. Can they help an entrepreneur be successful?  Absolutely.  The University of Texas’ Jon Brumley Texas Venture Labs has proven capable of developing MBA students into successful startup founders. The new Texas Venture Labs MBA Scholarship is now open and accepting qualified applicants with world-changing startup ideas. Learn more about the application requirements and submit your application today!

Older posts

© 2017 Texas MBA Insider

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Subscribe

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

Skip to toolbar