Author: Texas McCombs MBA (page 3 of 22)

Crossing all the T’s in your MBA Application

This MBA Insider info comes from the Texas McCombs MBA Admissions Team.

We know you want to put forth the best application you can when you apply to any Texas McCombs MBA program. And we’ve covered many components of the application in the past, including the resume, letter of recommendation, essays, and test scores (as well as some tips for interviewing if you are selected). But some components of the application that might be viewed as procedural are just as important, and if not addressed properly, they can delay processing, which can in turn delay your decision.

When you apply to a Texas McCombs MBA program, you’re actually applying to two separate entities at the same time. One is the McCombs School of Business; the other is the Graduate School of the University of Texas at Austin (which we’ll call GIAC, for the Graduate and International Admissions Center).

Three key components of the application are required by GIAC before it will be considered complete, and GIAC does not allow McCombs to issue a decision until these three elements are completed.

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How Test Scores Factor into Your MBA Application

This is the final installment in a series of posts on GMAT/GRE testing. We encourage you to review previous posts, if you have not already. This content was written by Dave Jackson, Senior Admissions Officer, Dallas/Fort Worth MBA.

The Texas MBA Admissions Committee recognizes that you might be putting a lot of pressure on yourself to achieve a high test score.  After all, you’re competitive and driven enough to want to pursue an MBA! It’s important to remember that your test score is only one piece of your story, and it’s considered in the context of your overall application. We review your scores with the knowledge that a test is only one day in your life, and your academic and work history span many years.

Nevertheless, the test is an important component in evaluating your application.

“Quantitative test scores, in particular, have proven to be predictive of success in an MBA program, and taking the GMAT or GRE gets you back into the practice of preparing for exams. The preparation you put into the test sets you up for the mindset you’ll have to bring to your MBA– setting aside time to study on a nightly basis and working your way through problems analytically.”

– Sharon Barrett, Director of Working Professional MBA Admissions at Texas McCombs

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Robert B. Rowling Hall Grand Opening

This post was written by Kimberly Jones, Marketing Coordinator, Texas McCombs MBA Programs.

The next class of Texas McCombs MBAs will start their MBA journey in a brand new business graduate school here at UT Austin: Robert B. Rowling Hall! On February 22, 2018 Rowling Hall held its Grand Opening Celebration. We were so excited to welcome the wider business community to our new home:

We shared the celebration excitement on social media:

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Professional or Executive: Which MBA Program is Right for You?

This MBA Insider info comes from Sharon Barrett, Director of Working Professional and Executive MBA Admissions.

If you compare the class profiles of our Texas Executive MBA with our Professional MBAs (Texas Evening MBA, Texas MBA at Dallas/Fort Worth, and Texas MBA at Houston programs), the differences can seem obvious. But there’s actually a broad grey area, where many professionals could fit very well in either type of program.

In the end, it’s a very personal decision about where to submit your application. But remember it’s a two-way street. You decide where you belong, and the admissions committee agrees on the fit. Here is some advice on how to make an informed choice about which MBA program to choose.

Consider Your Level & Years of Work Experience Carefully

Average work experience for the Texas MBA Program:

Program 80% Range Minimum
Professional MBA 3.25-11 years 2 years
Executive MBA 8-22 years 8 years

While people with the minimum eight years of experience do join the Executive MBA program, there are relatively few. Executive MBA candidates become more competitive within the 9-10 year range of work experience. On the other hand, Professional MBA candidates must have a minimum of two years of full-time work experience, and candidates get competitive with closer to four years. The admissions committee doesn’t simply count the years, but evaluates the quality of your work experience (the impact you’ve made to your organization, advancement in your role or responsibilities, and other factors), and also your level within the organization.

Generally, students in the Executive MBA have managed people, either directly or dotted-line, as well as budgets. Some rose to this level sooner in their careers than others. If you work in a small organization, your responsibilities can elevate very quickly. There are many manager level employees in the Professional MBA programs as well, but also quite a few individual contributors.

Executive MBA candidates on the low end of work experience and unsure of whether or not they would be a fit, should request a resume review. A short chat with a member of the admissions committee can allay any doubts about whether or not your work experience is appropriate and/or competitive.

Visit a Class to Gauge Your Fit

There’s no better way to self-assess than to sit in on an actual MBA class, especially one of the discussion-based ones. You can sign up now for an Executive MBA, Evening MBA, MBA at Houston, or MBA at Dallas/Fort Worth class visit now.

During the class, you’ll witness the collaborative and team-based environment that’s a big part of the fabric here at McCombs. The questions you should be asking yourself during your visit are: What can I contribute to this conversation? What assets would I bring to my study team?

Start Your App by Our Next Deadline: March 27, 2018

Texas MBAs are collegial, yet competitive. And the program you join will define your close-knit, professional network while in the program and beyond. Attend an event soon, or reach out to us with questions. Strategic thought about where you begin your relationship with the Texas MBA network sets you off on the right foot for your MBA journey and your career goals beyond the program. Ready to apply?

Hook ‘Em! \m/

Balancing Act: Family, Work, and Your MBA

This post was written by Dave Jackson, Senior Admissions Officer, Dallas/Fort Worth MBA.

Working professional MBA programs can be challenging when it comes to the competing priorities of work, school, and your personal life. Many wouldn’t think of adding to that mix, perhaps the ultimate challenge: caring for a new baby. Nevertheless, McCombs Working Professional MBA students have shown that a growing family can make it though the program with the right planning, prioritizing, and support network.

“There’s never a ‘right’ time to have a baby,” says Denise Xue, Texas Evening MBA Class of 2017, a financial analyst at Intel who gave birth to her son Daniel in April of 2016, during her fourth semester in the program.

“Having a baby while getting an MBA is certainly not easy, but I never regret one bit. You will be extremely busy, and feel challenged both physically and emotionally, but at the same time you will also feel proud of yourself for the things that you accomplished.”

Here is some advice from Denise and other recent parents for those contemplating parenthood in combination with their Texas MBA:

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